Transmitting Disputed Voices

In this performance lecture, we talked about ten participatory workshops we conducted in Rotterdam, and they focused on strengthening the female voice in the public sphere. The workshops addressed the issue of silencing specific voices, through practices that have been structured since antiquity and are still present. Consequently, they challenge the consolidation of patriarchal authoritarian characters that construct exclusive platforms of speech. Initially the participants were researchers and artists of our cycle, and then women from different cultural backgrounds, outside academia. The approach has been organically developed in an effort to bridge the different fields of knowledge. The lecture brought back selective elements of the workshops with the methodology built through the team, and went beyond the practices of the dominant discourse. Examples of methods are: collective reading of texts, deep listening, warming up and other tactile practices, transcribing personal experiences into scores and collectively executing them. We also channeled personal speech through others, distorted the tonality of our voice, performed angry thoughts, and retransmitted reconstructed voices. Through these methods, the conditions were created for marginalized voices to self-mediate, to be strengthened and to create a new space in which their field of knowledge is substantiated. Conditions that suggest other interpretations and actions beyond the assumption that voices must be logocentric in public dialogues. Continuing with the same logic of ‘reinforcement’, we wanted to transfer the field to other places, keeping the memory of it and bringing it to the here and now. The performance gave a lively presence to what happened and to those who participated, with the involvement of our own bodies.

Video still. Credits: Alkisti Diakrousi and Sotiris Dimitropoulos
Video still. Credits: Alkisti Diakrousi and Sotiris Dimitropoulos
Video still. Credits: Alkisti Diakrousi and Sotiris Dimitropoulos
Video still. Credits: Alkisti Diakrousi and Sotiris Dimitropoulos